Meter Is Here

meter-cover

Like Oprah, Hepstrack does do its own book club recommendations from time to time – we have some new reading material to share.

Earlier this week, tracksmith.com, an online-based premium running apparel company, debuted its new online publication, Meter Magazine.  In their own words shared on their introduction piece “Waiting for the Gun” written by Andy Waterman, “Meter is a magazine that basks in the history of running and celebrates competition: whether you’re challenging your rivals, the terrain or your own mental and physical limits, real magic happens under the cold light of competition… we also wanted Meter to reflect the communities that surround competitive running: casual observers are always surprised that an ostensibly solitary pastime like running breaks true community spirit.”

meter-heps-story

One of the feature articles in the Issue #00 is about our very own Heps.  Chris Lear talked with a number of coaches and former Ivy athletes in order to understand the uniqueness that makes Heps such a memorable event for anyone affiliated with the Ivy League.  Lear focuses on Columbia 2014 graduate Tim Cousins and Cousins’ quest to score for his team at Heps during his senior year in order to understand how Heps can impact an individual athlete.

Meter shares stories from running’s present and past.  Earlier this year, the fiftieth anniversary of Roger Bannister’s sub-4 minute mile was recognized in the press, but what many American runners might not know was that there was an Ivy Leaguer in that race with Bannister – Yale’s George Dole.  Dole competed on Yale’s track team as a half-miler, where he had finished 15th at the 1951 HepsXC and 3rd in the indoor two-mile at the 1952 Indoor Heps.    Dole was studying at Oxford and a member of Oxford’s track team when he was invited to compete in that now-legendary race on May 6, 1954.  Meter’s Peter Vigeron interviewed Dole about the race and how the race impacted Dole’s life.

Meter Magazine is free to read online (it requires you to register in order to read the issue), and costs only $5 if you want a color printed hardcopy.

photos from tracksmith twitter (top) and Emily Maye (right)

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