Women’s Indoor Heps Most Outstanding Performers

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1982 — Pat Melton of Yale set Heps records in the 55- (7.27) and 200-meter dashes (25.16)
1983 — Jenny Stricker of Harvard set a Heps record in the 3,000-meter run (9:09.49) and won the 1,500 (4:23.68)
1984 — Tracy Hanlon of Army set a Heps record in the pentathlon (3,791), finished second in the hurdles, fourth in the long jump and sixth in the high jump
1985 — Ellen O’Neil of Dartmouth won the 3,000- (9:34.35) and 5,000-meter runs (16:46.12)
1986 — Christelle Williams of Penn set a Heps record in the 200-meter dash (25.04), matched the 55-meter hurdle mark (8.12) and finished sixth in the triple jump
1987 — Kelly Groteke of Yale won the 3,000- (9:33.95) and 5,000-meter runs (17:10.84)
1988 — Diana Wills of Army set Heps records in the long (19-6) and triple jumps (41-7 3/4) while also winning the 55-meter dash (7.15)
1989 — Kim Seminiano of Army broke her own Heps record in the high jump (5-10 1/4) and won the pentathlon (3,356)
1990 — Meredith Rainey of Harvard won the 55- (7.08), 400- (52.96) and 800-meter events (2:09.87). Her 400-meter time remains a Heps record
mop-beaney1991 — Teri Smith of Brown won the 200- (24.82) and 400-meter dashes (55.07). Smith — who anchored the 4×400-meter relay to a Heps record — ran 24.39 in the 200m heats, also a meet mark
1992 — Susan Smith of Brown won the 55-meter dash (7.21) and hurdles (8.09) as well as anchored the winning mile relay. She also finished second in the 200
1993 — Kristin Beaney of Princeton won the 5,000-meter run (16:32.58) and finished second in the 3,000-meter run
1994 — Kristin Beaney of Princeton became the first two-time Outstanding Performer by winning both the 3,000- (9:27.78) and 5,000-meter runs (16:36.92)
1995 — Laura Woeller of Cornell won the 3,000- (9:52.68) and 5,000-meter runs (16:37.56)
1996 — Nicole Harrison of Princeton won the 55-meter dash (6.97) and hurdles (7.56)
1997 — Nicole Harrison of Princeton set Heps records in the 55-meter (6.94) and 200-meter dashes (24.22), and also placed first in the 55-meter hurdles (7.81)
1998 — Dora Gyorffy of Harvard won both the triple jump (40-3 1/4) and the high jump (6-3 1/4), setting a Heps record with that clearance
mop-taylor1999 — Dora Gyorffy of Harvard broke her own Heps record in the high jump (6-3 1/2), and won the triple jump (41-3)
2000 — Dora Gyorffy of Harvard matched an NCAA record in the high jump (6-5 1/2) and won the triple jump (41-9 3/4) for the third consecutive year
2001 — Brenda Taylor of Harvard won the 60- (7.64) and 200-meter dashes (24.29) as well as the 60-meter hurdles (8.44)
2002 — Katy Jay of Cornell won the 60- (7.62) and 200-meter dashes (24.34) and anchored the winning 4×400-meter relay
2003 — Joslyn Woodard of Yale won the 60- (7.59) and 200-meter dashes (24.47) as well as the long jump (18-6). Her 60m time set a meet record
2004 — Cack Ferrell of Princeton won the mile (4:50.88) and 3,000-meter runs (9:38.34)
2005 — Joslyn Woodard of Yale won the 60- (7.63) and 200-meter dashes (24.49) as well as the long jump (19-9 3/4)
2006 — Cack Ferrell of Princeton and Joslyn Woodard of Yale. Ferrell won the mile in Heps-record time (4:43.63) as well as the 3,000-meter run (9:17.60). Woodard became the first athlete to win 10 career titles, picking up wins in the 60-meter dash (7.61), 200-meter dash (24.80) and long jump (20-5 1/4)
2007 — Jeomi Maduka of Cornell won the long (19-10 3/4) and triple jumps (40-9 3/4) and finished second in the 60-meter dash
2008 — Jeomi Maduka of Cornell won the 60-meter dash (7.58), long jump (21-2) and triple jump (43-1 3/4). The long jump mark established a Heps record
2009 — Jeomi Maduka of Cornell won the 60-meter dash (7.47), 200-meter dash (24.51), long jump (20-6 1/2) and triple jump (43-10 1/2). The 60 and triple marks established Heps records as Maduka became the first person to win four individual events at a single Heps
2010 — Sharay Hale of Columbia had the fastest heat times in Heps history in the 200- and 400-meter dashes and then followed with wins in each, running 53.79 in the 400 and a meet-record 24.20 in the 200
2011 — Sharay Hale of Columbia set the all-time League record in the 200-meter dash semifinal (23.68) before winning the title. She won the 400 in 53.43, the second-fastest mark ever at the Championships. For good measure she anchored the Lions’ 4×400-meter relay to a meet record as well
2012 — Tory Worthen of Princeton set the lone women’s record at Indoor Heps, soaring 13-6 1/4 in the pole vault
2013 — This was the first year of separate Track and Field Most Outstanding Awards, and this year, the award went to record breakers.  Dartmouth’s Abbey D’Agostino won the mile (4:32.92) and 5,000-meter (15:47.02) runs in meet record breaking times.  Harvard’s Adabelle Ekechukwu became the first woman to throw past 20-meters at Heps, shattering the meet record and resetting her own League record to 68-04 1/4.
2014 — Seniors Dartmouth’s Abbey D’Agostino and Harvard’s Adabelle Ekechuwku won the Most Outstanding Athletes award for the second year in the row.  D’Agostino defended her mile (4:40.28) and 5,000-meter (16:08.70) titles, with this being her third-straight title in the mile.  D’Agostino also ran the second leg on the winning 4×800 relay.  Ekechukwu came within 2-centimeters of her League record in the weight throw, en route to her third straight conference title (68-03 1/4).
2015 – Harvard swept the Most Outstanding Awards, breaking some conference records in the process.  Senior Danielle Barbian defended her title in the 60m dash with a new conference record (7.40) and won the 200m (24.03).  Sophomore Nikki Okwelogu defended her shot put title while setting a new conference record (56-02).
2016 – Harvard senior Autumne Franklin became the second woman in Heps history to win four consecutive 60m hurdle titles, winning in 8.42 seconds.  She also won the 400m title in 54.60 less than 15 minutes after winning her hurdle title, as well ran the second leg of the winning 4×400 relay (3:40.81).  These three wins helped Franklin earn the Most Outstanding Track Athlete honor.  Princeton junior Allison Harris broke the meet record in the pole vault to claim the Most Outstanding Field Event honor.  Her winning height of 13-07 1/4 bested the previous meet mark set by Princeton’s Tory Worthen in 2012 (13-06 1/4).

2017 – Harvard sophomore sprinter Gabby Thomas led her Crimson to its fifth straight crown by winning both the 60- and 200-meter dashes in record times and running the second leg of the winning 4×400 relay. She won the 60 in 7.31 after posting an all-time league record 7.29 in the prelims. In the finals of the 200 she posted an amazing 22.88, which puts her among the nation’s top sprinters.  She was honored with the Most Outstanding Track Athlete honor.  Dartmouth freshman Cha’Mia Rothwell stood strong in her first conference championship, winning the long jump (20-3) and thus becoming just the seventh Ivy woman to soar 20 feet in the indoor long jump. But more notably she set an all-time league record in the 60-meter hurdles (8.30), breaking the conference mark set by Harvard Olympian Brenda Taylor.  She is the first Big Green athlete to win either event at an Indoor Heps championships.  She was given the Most Outstanding Field Event honor.